Emily Speed Artist talk Wednesday 7 May 2014, 6.30pm onwards Standpoint Gallery, London   After using the residency to reflect on recent work and in turn, possible future works, Emily will give a short talk that introduces some of her current interests and ideas around scale models, men, hubris, cake and verisimilitude in Mussolini’s EUR area of Rome. There will be a small fold-out publication to accompany the talk as well as an architectural cake, to be eaten during the evening.   For the Facebook event click here   Emily Speed (based in Frodsham, Cheshire) is currently on residency at Standpoint Gallery, as part of Standpoint Futures Residencies 2013/14

Emily Speed
Artist talk

Wednesday 7 May 2014, 6.30pm onwards

Standpoint Gallery, London

 

After using the residency to reflect on recent work and in turn, possible future works, Emily will give a short talk that introduces some of her current interests and ideas around scale models, men, hubris, cake and verisimilitude in Mussolini’s EUR area of Rome. There will be a small fold-out publication to accompany the talk as well as an architectural cake, to be eaten during the evening.
 
For the Facebook event click here
 
Emily Speed (based in Frodsham, Cheshire) is currently on residency at Standpoint Gallery, as part of Standpoint Futures Residencies 2013/14

One of the reasons I really wanted to do this residency (aside from the change of scene and studio visits) was to have time to reflect on how I work. This year I have been teaching 0.5 as well, so studio-going has gotten more difficult, but regardless, I have been in a weird pattern of doing very finite projects/commissions since early 2012. The well-dodgy diagram above tries to show how that kind of working mode ends up being a bit of a dead end; you’re going in a mostly straight line between different-shaped, but similarly-sized deadlines. Having deadlines and commissions is obviously a great thing (no complaints about having work!) but at what point does it stop being truly useful if it all sits on the same plateau? How to move things on and make a change? I’m off to go and research funding sources/pots of gold.
ES

One of the reasons I really wanted to do this residency (aside from the change of scene and studio visits) was to have time to reflect on how I work. This year I have been teaching 0.5 as well, so studio-going has gotten more difficult, but regardless, I have been in a weird pattern of doing very finite projects/commissions since early 2012. The well-dodgy diagram above tries to show how that kind of working mode ends up being a bit of a dead end; you’re going in a mostly straight line between different-shaped, but similarly-sized deadlines. Having deadlines and commissions is obviously a great thing (no complaints about having work!) but at what point does it stop being truly useful if it all sits on the same plateau? How to move things on and make a change? I’m off to go and research funding sources/pots of gold.


ES

***SAVE THE DATE***

Mapping Art Practice in the UK
Monday 23 June 2014

Tickets will soon be available for Mapping Art Practice, a symposium that will consider how artistic experience and production can differ in support, development, economics, networks and interactivity, depending on different locations within the UK

Mapping Art Practice is in response to Standpoint Futures Residencies and it’s intention of connecting art worlds between London and other cities or towns


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More soon!

Exhibitions

The first wonderful thing about having a few weeks to be in London (without other obligations!) is spending a lot of time looking at exhibitions. The 2 hours I spent at 176 on Saturday watching ALL the films made me realise how rare it is to be so unhurried, with nowhere you need to be at x o’clock. It was some extremely languid exhibition-going. I thought I should keep a record of what I have seen while I am here with some comments about the things that really struck me.I have already forgotten which ones happened when.

176. Stuart Whipps - very cool and considered. The medium format slides had a lovely quality and the coloured backgrounds made it pretty mesmerising.

176. Trisha Baga - Total joy, I laughed me pants off on that sofa for the whole 50 mins of her film ‘There is no ‘I’ in Trisha’. The 3D work was really captivating too, but made me feel queasy. I had been pondering a piece that would need 3D so it made me do that artist thing of mentally throwing my toys out of the pram for a moment too. The Madonna film without music was just hilarious.

176. Infinite City - the subject matter was totally up my street so I really loved this. Couldn’t believe how prescient the film (from 1996) with aeroplanes playing hide and seek among the skyscrapers of NYC was. Amie Siegal and Yelena Popova’s films were also really captivating.

Eleanor Moreton at Ceri hand Gallery - what a shame this was the closing day for CHG. Eleanor’s paintings are incredible; the ladies are done with such reserve and opposite them, narrative scenes had very lickable backgrounds. Seductive paint.

Richard Deacon at Tate Britain - The tropical ceramic work! Lush. The smaller pieces were also lovely and although the bigger works excite me less, there is no denying that this man totally knows his stuff. There’s an understanding of the materials, which is really admirable. This is what happens if you work, I mean really work and play, in your studio.

Phyllida Barlow at Tate Britain - Just incredible and too much to take in in one go. I shall have to go back. I love her.

Benedict Drew at Matt’s Gallery - The first film has stuck with me most but it was a great show; really bold and irreverent and a smart mix of hi and low-fi.

Camille Henrot at Chisenhale - I had been already, but was glad to get a second look, mainly because there is so much to see and so many links to make between the objects/placement and imagery. It is so good. So so good. Again, there is an irreverence (see Drew above) and playfulness that seems to lay bare the way an artist thinks.

Iain Hales at Standpoint - Another person that is totally into his materials and processes and it shows - really accomplished show and some lovely lovely things here. Look what happens when you help support artists to work for a year on new things (Mark Tanner award). More of this in the world please.

Abstract Drawing at Drawing Room - I did my MA in drawing and I have a special soft spot for anything drawing-based, so this was a pleasure. Some really gorgeous works in this show and the new reading room is also fantastic. Need to go back to spend an afternoon reading as many of the books as possible.

There is a few more, but that’s enough words for one blogpost I think!

ES